#SmileOfTheStowaway by Tony Bassett @tonybassett1 #BlogTour #AuthorInterview @rararesources

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Many thanks to Rachel @ Rachel’s Random Resources for arranging the following interview with Tony Bassett…..

For those who don’t know already, could you tell us about yourself and your book(s) please?

Thank you for showing interest in my book. I worked as a journalist on local and national newspapers until I started writing novels four years ago. The crime novel Smile Of The Stowaway – the book featuring in my blog tour – is the first book I’ve had published. It concerns a couple, Bob and Anne, who live in Kent. They befriend a stowaway found hiding beneath their motorhome and find him a job. Then he is accused of murdering a work colleague in a cottage in a remote hamlet. Anne works tirelessly to find the real killer and clear their friend’s name.

Where did/do you get your ideas from?

I got the idea for writing Smile Of The Stowaway while working as a freelance journalist for the national press in September 2014. I reported on a couple from Derbyshire who hired a motorhome in Ashford, Kent. When they arrived back, a man stepped out from beneath the vehicle. In this real life incident, the man (from Eritrea in Africa) was handed to the police. But I wondered what would have happened if they had harboured him instead. As I have always been interested in writing crime fiction, I devised a murder and the idea took off from there.

Are any of your characters based (however loosely) on anyone you know?

My characters are not intentionally based on anyone I know. However, I have met a lot of people as a journalist and, inevitably, facets of some of their personalities must have had an effect on my writing.

How do you pick your characters names?

I use various ways to invent names. There is information on certain websites regarding surnames that relate to particular counties or regions of Britain. Many of the names in Smile Of The Stowaway are names that often crop up in Kent – such as Rigden, Couchman and Packham. There are several Romanian names in the novel which I found out about online. I try as far as possible to have a fair cross-section of the kind of names that would be found in a community.

Can you share your writing process with us, in a nutshell?

Each of the five novels I have written has taken me between three and four months to write from start to finish. I begin by thinking of a situation and how the novel will commence. Then I plan the first three or four chapters and start writing and researching. As I proceed, thoughts emerge as to how the storyline will develop and how the book might end. After a few chapters, I create a file of notes and research details which gets larger and larger as the weeks progress. I never make detailed chapter plans more than three or four chapters ahead.

Who are your top 5 favourite authors?

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, John Buchan, Val McDermid, (whom I used to work with on the Sunday People), Peter James and Ian Rankin.

If you could meet any author, who would it be and what would you ask them?

I’d love to talk to Conan Doyle or Agatha Christie, but sadly of course they are no longer with us. I’d like to ask them to what extent their writing was influenced by literary agents, publishers, fans and the public generally. Or whether they wrote exactly what they wanted to write without regard to market forces or the whims of others.

Were you a big reader as a child?

I don’t think I was an exceptionally avid reader as a child. I read a fair amount.

When did you start to write?

I became interested in writing at the age of nine when I suddenly found I was getting top marks for my essays for the first time. Within months I was editing a school magazine.

If you could re-write the ending to any book what would it be and what would you change?

I have read many books that have left me disappointed at the end, but because their endings weren’t memorable I have quickly forgotten them and moved on. I tend to read crime novels by reputable authors and I wouldn’t have the temerity to suggest a way of revising any of their endings!

Is there a book you wish you had written?

There’s no book I wish I had written. But it would be terrific to enjoy the same sort of success that authors like John Buchan (The Thirty-Nine Steps) or Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl) have experienced.

If you wrote an autobiography, what would your title be?

I’m not sure I’ve achieved enough yet! I might possibly call it All My Born Days, if the title has not been used already!

If you could invite any fictional character for coffee who would it be and where would you take them?

I’d like to take Sherlock Holmes to Starbucks in Baker Street. He’d never believe the prices! He’d probably say: ‘Two Pounds sixty pence for a Cappuccino?’ Then he’d glance at the other prices and say something like: ‘Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth.’

What are you working on right now?

I have just finished the first draft of the follow-up book to Smile Of The Stowaway. I’ve got several ideas for a title but haven’t settled on one yet. It is a spy thriller involving the same couple who appear in the first book, Bob and Anne Shaw.

Do you have a new release due?

Not at the moment.

What do you generally do to celebrate on publication day?

Have a few beers with my partner, Lin.

How can readers keep in touch with you?

The best way for readers to reach me is via my website (www.tonybassett.com) or via the Smile Of The Stowaway page on Facebook.

Is there anything else you would like us to know?

I’m hoping to hold a competition for book lovers during my blog tour, offering free
copies of Smile Of The Stowaway as prizes.

Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions, Tony 🙂

Smile Of The Stowaway

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A married couple, a stranger from far away and a murder that rocks their lives. Desperate to reach England, a bedraggled immigrant clings precariously beneath a couple’s motor home as they cross the Channel. Once holidaymakers Bob and Anne overcome their shock at his discovery and their initial reservations, they welcome the friendly stranger into their home in defiance of the law. But their trust is stretched to the limit when the police accuse the smiling twenty-three-year-old of a gruesome murder. Could this man from six thousand miles away be guilty? Or is the real killer still out there? Former national newspaper journalist Tony Bassett tells how Anne turns detective, battling against a mountain of circumstantial evidence and police bungling to discover the truth. This gripping first novel concerning a death in a remote Kentish country cottage is packed with mystery, suspense and occasional touches of humour.

Purchase Links

UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Smile-Stowaway-Tony-Bassett/dp/1911546457
US – https://www.amazon.com/Smile-Stowaway-Tony-Bassett/dp/1911546457

Author Bio –

Tony Bassett, who was born in West Kent, grew up wanting to be a writer from the age of nine when he edited a school magazine. After attending Hull University where he won a `Time-Life’ magazine student journalism award, he spent six years working as a journalist in Sidcup, Worcester and Cardiff before moving to Fleet Street. Tony spent 37 years working for the national press, mainly for the `Sunday People’ where he worked both for the newsdesk and the investigations department. He helped cover the Jeremy Thorpe trial for the `Evening Standard’, broke the news in the `Sun’ of Bill Wyman’s plans to marry Mandy Smith and found evidence for the `Sunday People’ of Rod Stewart’s secret love child. On one occasion, while working for `The People’, he took an escaped gangster back to prison. His first book, `Smile Of The Stowaway’, is one of four crime novels Tony has written over the past three years. He has five grown-up children and eleven grandchildren. He lives in South East London with his partner, Lin.

Social Media Links –

https://www.facebook.com/tonybassettauthor/

Twitter: @tonybassett1

Tony’s author website
http://www.tonybassettauthor.com

Follow, like and share the book love with these awesome book bloggers…..

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happy reading 🙂

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#ThePainter by Deirdre Quiery @SupernovaQ @UrbaneBooks #BlogTour #AuthorInterview #LoveBooksTours

Welcome to my stop on Deirdre Quiery’s The Painter blog tour with Love Books Tours!

The Painter cover

Author 

Belfast born Deirdre Quiery is based in Mallorca where she runs Seven Rocks Consulting. Not just a writer, Deirdre has not only painted with Argentinian artist Carlos Gonzalez in Palma and Natalia Spitale in Soller, she is also a winner of the Alexander Imich Prize in the US for writing about exceptional human experiences, and the Birmingham Trophy Prize in the UK.  The Painter is her third novel for Urbane following the Irish thriller Eden Burning and murder mystery The Secret Wound

Many thanks to Kelly @ Love Books Tours for arranging the following interview with Deirdre Quiery…..

Q. For those who don’t know already, could you tell us about yourself and your book(s) please?

A. I was born in Belfast and grew up during what are called The Troubles. The 1970s were incredibly terrifying for me. My family were put out of our house at gunpoint. My parents lost everything that they had saved and bought during their marriage. We lived afterwards on a house on “The Peace Line” with daily rioting, three bombs placed outside the house which was taken over twice by the IRA. We even had a poltergeist that was very active to add to the drama of life.

I studied Spanish and Portuguese at Leeds University. It was very much literature based and I loved Spanish literature from “The Golden Age”. After University, I was offered a job as a District Manager in Financial Services and then became a Leadership Consultant which I still do freelance – travelling to 32 countries in the world and helping build skills around emotional intelligence, communication, coaching and conflict resolution.

The biggest change in my life was leaving a world of security and full time work to move 16 years ago to Mallorca, with my husband, our cat Ziggy and two suitcases. We didn’t know what would happen. In many ways it resembled being put out of our house in Belfast in the 1970s as we had nothing and did not know what would happen to us but this time it was a voluntary choice. I felt full of enthusiasm and possibilities.

In Mallorca I wrote my three books. “Eden Burning” based on my experiences in Northern Ireland, “The Secret Wound” exploring life within an ex-pat community in Mallorca where a killer is living a normal life and my recent novel “The Painter” which tells the story of a child prodigy painter, who becomes famous, dissipates his life, commits murder and then in a relationship with his Gardener, he falls into a love-hate relationship which ultimately redeems him.
Q. Where did/do you get your ideas from?

A. Observing life. I find people endlessly fascinating. Growing up in Northern Ireland during the Troubles was maybe lucky for me. I saw how depraved and full of hatred a human being could be and at the same time I also saw others who were inspirationally amazing and unselfish and who did give up their lives to save others. That spectrum of human potential inspires my writing. In Mallorca, I also observed people who have lots of money and live in a beautiful island but they are not happy. There are events which happen here which have all the basis of a Greek tragedy. Sometimes – especially when I lived in an isolated olive grove for 10 years – I felt that I was on stage when some of the dramas unfolded within the local community.

Q. Are any of your characters based (however loosely) on anyone you know?

A. Yes. But I never have written autobiographically. I take inspiration from real people as if they were pots of paint and I paint something completely unique which I feel in a way honours their essence.

Q. How do you pick your characters’ names?

A. The name of each character is extremely important to me. I feel that in naming them, I am bringing them into the world. I take time to think about their names before I begin to write. For example in my latest novel “The Painter” – I called him Augustin – based on the famous Saint Augustine who lived a wild life before converting. He said, “Lord, make me pure but not yet.” That is definitely the mind of The Painter.

Q. Can you share your writing process with us, in a nutshell?

A. I have experimented with different ways of writing. I have found something which I know works best for me. I have to have an inspiring plot that means something to me. I then create character pages for each of the key protagonists – what age are they, what colour are their eyes, what do they like to eat. That is very helpful when I begin writing because I don’t really know them yet and I am still bringing them to life. Later into the writing process I deepen their personalities with little quirks and interests which make them unique.

Q. Who are your top 5 favourite authors?

A. Jack Kerouac. A S Byatt. John Banville. J M Cotzee and Graham Greene. I sometimes feel that I am a female Graham Greene.

Q. If you could meet any author, who would it be and what would you ask them?

A. I would like to meet Ernest Hemmingway and ask him why he liked bullfighting.
Q. Were you a big reader as a child?

A. Yes. I started reading at the age of 7 with three library tickets. I read three books a week and those books with a small bag of pineapple cubes were everything I wanted from life.

Q. When did you start to write?

A. I have always kept a journal from the age of 18. Then I began to write poetry at University. I entered a few writing competitions and won first prize for The Imich Competition in the USA for writing about exceptional human experience and The Birmingham Trophy Competition which was business based.

Q. If you could re-write the ending to any book what would it be and what would you change?

A. Some people have told me that they would like a sequel to Eden Burning my first novel. Maybe I could have written a little more about what happened to the characters after the final scene and even thrown in another twist or murder.

Q. Is there a book you wish you had written?

A. I had an idea when I started writing of creating a new version of the Irish legend “Deirdre of the Sorrows”. I even began writing it – setting it in The Troubles in the 1970s. I was particularly inspired that the Irish writer J M Synge who died on my birthday had an uncompleted novel of “Deirdre of the Sorrows”. I love the Irish use of symbolism, myth and animals.

Q. If you wrote an autobiography, what would your title be?
A. “Go Against the Stream.”

Q. If you could invite any fictional character for coffee who would it be and where would you take them?

A. I would invite CIA Agent Alden Pyle from Graham Greene’s “The Quiet American” to the Randemar Restaurant in the Port of Soller and get some tips from him on my next novel.
Q. What are you working on right now?

A. I have recently completed “The Painter”. I have a few thoughts for my fourth novel but first I want to support the launch of “The Painter”. It is a creative act in itself looking at who might be a future reader. It is also very exciting. I am going to enjoy it.

Q. Tell us about your last release?

A. My last release was “The Secret Wound” in London in the summer of 2017.

Q. Do you have a new release due?

A. Yes – totally thrilled that it will be this summer 2019 for “The Painter”.

Q. What do you generally do to celebrate on publication day?

A. For “Eden Burning” we celebrated with Irish tapas in The Irish Pub in the Port of Soller. For “The Secret Wound” we celebrated in London with an exhibition of my art and Molly Sterling – who represented Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest a few years ago singing in St Mark’s Church. It was a night I will never forget.

Q. How can readers keep in touch with you?

A. I would love to hear from them. Drop me an email on deirdre@deirdrequiery.com or on Twitter @SupernovaQ.

Q. Is there anything else you would like us to know?

A. I’m interested in what we are meant to do with this brief and beautiful human life. I believe that I am meant to write about what we are meant to do in a thriller novel format where the characters are trying to work it out. I love the fact that I create these characters, I love them – even when they are very wicked. I can’t always help them because they have to live their own lives but if they whisper to me from the heart – I will do my best to ease to allow them to reach the fullness of their potential.

Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions, Deirdre 🙂

Thank you Kerry – I so appreciate your interest.

 

Blurb

In a desire to impress the people who visit his workshop, renowned artist The Painter, employs a gardener to create an inspirational landscape which includes a labyrinth, an orange grove and Moorish-inspired fountains. They develop an intimate relationship and the Painter, whose life and talent had become increasingly dissipated, finds himself slowly recovering his original innocence and talent. However, the relationship is tainted by the Painter’s jealousy when visitors express more interest in the magical garden and mysterious labyrinth than in the Painter’s art. That jealously blossoms into deadly rage when The Painter catches the gardener changing one of his paintings…. Deirdre Quiery’s compelling new thriller explores themes of love, life and deceit, and examines the lengths we will go to pursue and protect our passions.  

Buy Link

https://amzn.to/2TQCbKQ

happy reading 🙂

 

 

#SealedWithADeath by @JamesSilvester1 @UrbaneBooks #BlogTour #AuthorInterview #LoveBooksTours

Welcome to my stop on James Silvester’s Sealed With A Death blog tour with Love Books Tours!

Sealed With Death tour

Many thanks to Kelly @ Love Books Tours for arranging the following interview with James Silvester…..

For those who don’t know already, could you tell us about yourself and your book(s) please?

Hello there! I’m James and I write political thrillers. My first two books, Escape to Perdition and The Prague Ultimatum, were set in the Czech Republic. Last year I started a new series featuring Lucie Musilova as Britain’s most reluctant spy in Blood, White and Blue; Sealed with a Death is its sequel.

Where did/do you get your ideas from?

From real life, mainly. I try to keep things current and in tune with what readers may recognise going on around them, but then push it a little bit further and a little bit out of the ordinary. It’s up to others whether that’s successful but I hope it encourages people to think about things.

Are any of your characters based (however loosely) on anyone you know?

Some characters, particularly the villains, might be a pastiche of several people in the public eye rather than a direct caricature. I always base a character’s physical appearance on a real person, usually actors I like, and sometimes friends.

How do you pick your characters’ names?

A mixture really; there’s no hard and fast rule. Again, sometimes I’ll use friends names (with permission) if I think it suits – the protagonist in my first book is named after a mate of mine – and I might mash together actors names too. A character in my new book actually got their name thanks to a Christmas competition run by a Facebook reader group; I offered the chance for a reader to name a character and I picked the answer I though fitted best.
Can you share your writing process with us, in a nutshell?

One hour’s work followed by three days of crushing self-doubt. Repeat. Once I have the story and synopsis in place things start to come together. I write completely out of sequence, putting in scenes and exchanges that are in my head, then go back and link them all together.
Who are your top 5 favourite authors?
This often changes, but today it would be:

Bernard Cornwell
Mary Shelley
John le Carre
Douglas Adams
If you could meet any author, who would it be and what would you ask them?

I’ve been lucky enough to meet a few and they’ve been lovely. I’d love to meet a really prolific author like Agatha Christie and try to find out how she maintained that standard over so long. I’d also love to meet Franz Kafka, I bet that’d be a really interesting day…

Were you a big reader as a child?

Yes, I used to read Enid Blyton then moved onto Conan-Doyle and Fleming. In my teenage years I read the horror classics and a lot of sci-fi, then got back into Cold War and spy fiction again.
When did you start to write?

About 2012 I started to seriously try and write a book. Before then I’d toyed with the idea but kept putting it off.

If you could re-write the ending to any book what would it be and what would you change?
Is there a book you wish you had written?
Jaws. Love the book but hate the ending; I just think there’s no real climax and the shark just sort of turns over and slip away. That said, I’m not exactly sure how I’d alter it. I wish I’d written 1984, but also The Spy who came in from the cold – that was genre defining.
If you wrote an autobiography, what would your title be?

Apologies for the inconvenience.
If you could invite any fictional character for coffee who would it be and where would you take them?
If it’s ‘any’ fictional character I’d pick Doctor Who, however from the purely literary world, I think I’d like to sit in a café somewhere and people watch with Sherlock Holmes.
What are you working on right now?

Sealed with a Death is out now and I’m working on promoting that. I’m also doing a few interviews with people I admire and will be promoting those shortly as well.

Tell us about your last release?

Blood, White and Blue was the first in the Lucie Musilova series. Lucie is a half Czech, half British spy recruited into the security services to investigate a decades old plot.

Do you have a new release due?

Sealed with a Death – out July 11th.
What do you generally do to celebrate on publication day?

Quietly. If I’ve money in the bank I’ll get a bottle of champagne, if I haven’t then it’s a beer from the fridge. I’ve had launch parties in the past which are always great fun, and it’s a pleasure to be friendly with other authors who are always so supportive.
How can readers keep in touch with you?

The best ways are through Twitter (@jamessilvester1) and Facebook (@jamessilvesterauthor).

Is there anything else you would like us to know?

Just that support from bloggers and readers is always hugely appreciated. Thanks to everyone.

Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions, James 🙂

You’re very welcome, thanks for having me on!

Sealed with a death cover_Chosen.indd

Blurb

Still new to the top secret Overlappers intelligence team, and on her first `hit’ alone, Lucie Musilova has an attack of conscience and nearly botches the operation, taking a bullet wound before finishing off her target. Though her injuries are minor, she is chastised for her carelessness and assigned desk duties. Here she investigates a number of disappearances of European women from Britain – the women all missing without trace until the body of one is discovered, raped and murdered. Lucie learns that tens of women have disappeared, all with little investigation. As she digs deeper she begins to uncover a terrifying international conspiracy that potentially threatens not just her life, but to topple Governments….  

Buy Link

https://amzn.to/2ZuvnH2

happy reading 🙂

 

Author Information

James Silvester’s debut novel and sequel, Escape to Perdition and The Prague Ultimatum, reflected his love both of central Europe and the espionage genre and was met with widespread acclaim. His new series features strong female protagonist Lucie Musilova, a character fully reflective of Europe’s changing cultural and political landscape. James lives in Manchester.    

#TheGreenViper (James Ryker Book 4) by Rob Sinclair @RSinclairAuthor #BookReview @Bloodhoundbook

The Green Viper

This series just gets better and better, if that’s at all possible. Ryker is undoubtedly one of my favourite fictional characters and Rob Sinclair is undoubtedly one of my favourite authors.

If you haven’t read the other books in this series then I highly recommend you do so, in order, if for no other reason than you are seriously missing out if you don’t!

The Green Viper (book 4) finds Ryker in receipt of a coded message at a secret location. A secret location only he and one other person knows about and that other person is his ex-boss who is now dead! When he realises the message is from his ex-boss’s widow, he accepts her death bed plea to help their son, Campbell, who has managed to get himself involved with some seriously dodgy criminals who hide their extra income behind seemingly successful, legitimate, businesses. These people are obsessed with money and power. Certainly not the kind of people I would choose to associate with, but Campbell is already involved with one of their daughters and finds the lure of thousands of pounds at a time and fancy cars too much to resist, despite having his reservations. Feuding ‘business men’, full of greed, want what the other has and Campbell finds himself in the middle of it all with Ryker trying to discreetly find a way of extricating him from the volatile situation, but it was never going to be an easy task.

This book is extremely fast-paced and full of action. Sometimes quite brutally violent! I do love the fight scenes. Ryker certainly knows how to handle himself. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, this series needs to be on TV. I think it would be awesome.

I was totally captivated, as with the previous books in the series. I loved the very last line of the book! I’m so glad I’m able to start book 5 straight away! Watch this space for my review of The White Scorpion.

Via AmazonUK…..

James Ryker is back and better than ever.

I need your help. Call me.

Ex-intelligence agent James Ryker receives a coded message through a secret drop point, a means of communication known only to him and one other person. The problem is, that person is his ex-boss, Mackie… and he’s already dead.

But the cry for help is real, and it’s a request Ryker can’t refuse.

Travelling to New York alone and without official sanction, Ryker has a single goal in mind, yet even he couldn’t have bargained for the violent world he’s soon embroiled in. Caught in the middle of a spiralling chaos, with the FBI on one side and warring underworld bosses on the other, Ryker must put all of his skills to the test in order to come out on top and keep his word.

In a world full of lies and deceit, loyalty is everything, and it’s time for James Ryker to pay his dues.

Also available in the international best-selling James Ryker Series:

The Red Cobra

The Black Hornet

The Silver Wolf

What everyone is saying about The Green Viper:

“Amazing story. Amazing ending. Well worth reading.” G. Silvers

“fast-paced, utterly absorbing and … totally believable.” Judith

“An all-action fast-paced thriller with James Ryker doing what he does best.” Mark Gardner

“Excellent book, loved the pace, action, twists & turns.” Pete Strange

Rob Sinclair is the best-selling author of The Enemy Series, Dark Fragments and Sleeper 13. The Green Viper is a fast-paced, globe-trotting thriller full of breathless action. It can be read as the 4th book in the best-selling Ryker Series or as a thrilling standalone. It will appeal to fans of books like Mark Dawson’s The Cleaner, James Swallow’s Nomad and L.T. Ryan’s Noble Beginnings.

ICYMI…..

The Red Cobra #BlogTour @RSinclairAuthor @Bloodhoundbook #BookReview #bloghounds @sarahhardy681

The Black Hornet (James Ryker Book 2) by Rob Sinclair @RSinclairAuthor @Bloodhoundbook #BookReview

The Silver Wolf (James Ryker Book 3) by Rob Sinclair @RSinclairAuthor #BookReview

happy reading 🙂

From the Outside by @ClareS_J #BlogTour #AuthorInterview @UrbaneBooks #LoveBooksTours

Welcome to my stop on Clare Johnston’s From the Outside blog tour with Love Books Tours!

From the Outside tour

Many thanks to Kelly @ Love Books Group Tours for arranging the following interview with Clare Johnstone…..

For those who don’t know already, could you tell us about yourself and your book(s) please?

I’m Clare Johnston and I’m a journalist from Edinburgh. From the Outside is my second novel. The first, Polls Apart, was published in 2011.

Where did/do you get your ideas from?

Firstly I think of themes I want to write around. I love politics, but in particular I love the drama around it and the characters within the soap opera that is Westminster so that’s why I decided to write a political thriller in Polls Apart.
The inspiration for From the Outside came from my long-held belief that death is not the end. I’ve had several instances in my life where I felt I have connected with loved ones who have passed away, and that made we wonder whether they can influence our lives and decisions from beyond the grave in some way.

Are any of your characters based (however loosely) on anyone you know?

My characters often reflect people I know, have met or have observed in some way over the years. The two central characters in From the Outside, twins Harry and Ben Melville, are I guess reflections of myself. One is shy and lacks self-confidence, the other is outgoing, controlling and has a big ego. I think many of us can have that kind of dual side to our personality so that’s something I wanted to explore. We can be deeply flawed but it doesn’t necessarily make us bad people, particularly if we try to make amends. The strengths, humour, vulnerabilities and quirks of friends and family also tend to find their way into my work. Sometimes they recognise situations that we’ve been in together and it’s lovely when they text or call to tell me they spotted it.

How do you pick your characters’ names?
I think it’s a little like picking the names of children or pets. You have a sense of their personalities and what they look like and you try to pair that with names you think would suit them. Sometimes a character is just a real type and so you think of similar people you know and come up with a similar name (never the same name though, in case you offend them!).

Can you share your writing process with us, in a nutshell?
I start with a core idea; in Polls Apart it was about the leader of the opposition and his actress wife who separated during an election campaign and every move each made had an impact on the polls. To win the election he had to win his wife back. In From the Outside, the idea was to explore whether we can in death make amends for the wrongs we have committed in life. I chose to create a man with a complex, dual personality in Harry Melville, and his twin emerged almost immediately in my mind as his alter ego. Once I have my core idea and central characters I start writing. I might map out the next few chapters ahead as ideas come, but I don’t map out the entire novel – I feel my way. New characters emerge and grow with the story.

Who are your top 5 favourite authors?
Tough, because I read a lot and they can change. Ian McEwan is up there, as is Donna Tartt, Jodi Picoult tells a great story, and I’ve read and enjoyed a lot of Maggie O’Farrell’s work. I’m also going to say Irvine Welsh because his writing is electrifying and I’ve also had the pleasure of interviewing him and he’s an all-round good sort.

If you could meet any author, who would it be and what would you ask them?
I would love to meet Ian McEwan. I so admire him. It’s clear whenever you read one of his novels that he was right inside that story. He is able to create an atmosphere so vivid that you feel as though you are inside the story right with him. I’d actually like to do an interview with him, finding out which novels he’s most proud of, if he has any regrets, how he works, whether he is ever blinded by self doubt. So many of the most talented people I know are.

Were you a big reader as a child?
The short answer to that is yes. I enjoyed reading as a child and I also enjoyed writing stories, but I didn’t get any encouragement from teachers in school. I was hopeless at maths and science so I was written off and put into all the bottom sets. Then, I would say from around 12, I started to read a lot. I read newspapers, I read whatever I could lay my hands on and it transformed my writing abilities. The only As I got in school were for English and Modern Studies (political studies) – purely based on reading.

When did you start to write?
I was lost in my imagination as a child and did a lot of acting so I was always creating shows and comedy sketches. I really enjoyed creative writing in school in my teens and that was when I got the bug. I went into journalism (it was a bit of a no-brainer based on my skills) so in that sense I became a professional writer as soon as I left university. I started writing fiction around 11 years ago when my kids were very young and I had a bit of time in the evenings because they went to bed at 7 – which they don’t do now they are in their teens!

If you could re-write the ending to any book what would it be and what would you change?
It’s a bit of a sell-out answer really, but I could never re-write the ending to anyone else’s book. There are those books that you race through because they’re such page turners and you can’t wait until the final twist at the end only to find it’s a bit of a damp squib – I guess they peaked too soon. A lot of books don’t give you closure (which personally I like) but each has been carefully crafted by the author so you have to take them as they come – and make up your own ultimate endings in your mind if you’re not satisfied with them!

Is there a book you wish you had written?
I thought We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver was off-the-scale good. It was so carefully considered, it posed so many questions. I thought about it long after I finished reading it.

If you wrote an autobiography, what would your title be?
That’s another fine mess I got myself into

If you could invite any fictional character for coffee who would it be and where would you take them?
I’m going to go for Ian Rankin’s Inspector Rebus because he lives near me so we could meet at the local Costa, and I could grill him on all those grisly murders and what’s going on in his personal life, though I think he’d thank me for the coffee and leave.

What are you working on right now?
I am half-way through a novel about sex-trafficking and why loneliness makes you vulnerable to bad choices, that I’m making very slow progress on.

Tell us about your last release?
My last release was Polls Apart, which although it had a political setting, was really about a relationship that was put under intense scrutiny. Life-held values and principles got lost in the race for public support. I liked the idea of going behind the scenes of a general election campaign and exploring the impact of a person’s every move being put under the microscope. Just a few ill-chosen words could blow your chances of becoming Prime Minister and that made for very fertile ground for a novel.

Do you have a new release due?
From the Outside will be published by Urbane Publications on July the 4th. It follows the aftermath of the death in a car crash of multimillionaire philanthropist Harry Melville and the impact it has on his twin brother, Ben and wife, Sarah. As we watch them struggle with grief and their guilt over their individual relationship issues with Harry, we begin to learn that he was not quite the golden boy he was portrayed as in the press. There are lots of twists and turns along the way, and a few laughs too hopefully. I’d never want a reader to be bored for a second so I keep up the pace, along with the suspense. There are also a lot of tender moments in there and it’s a chance to reflect on whether there may just be life after death.

What do you generally do to celebrate on publication day?
Last time I had a book launch at a local branch of Waterstones, and this time around – on July 4th – Blackwells are hosting a launch for From the Outside which I’m really looking forward to. I’ll be giving a bit of a talk to begin with, then taking questions before doing a signing.

How can readers keep in touch with you?
They can reach me via my Facebook page – http://www.facebook/honestclare, or on Twitter @clareS_J or through my website http://www.honest.scot

Is there anything else you would like us to know?
Only that every time someone tells me they’ve read my work it makes my heart sing. It’s special to know you have that shared connection with a person who has entered your world for a few hours of their life and that you have been able to suspend them in time with you for a little while.

Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions, Clare 🙂

From the Outside cover

Blurb

When internet millionaire and philanthropist Harry Melville dies in a car crash at the age of forty four, the lives of his wife, Sarah, and twin brother, Ben, are thrown into turmoil.

Harry seemed to have it all; a close-knit family and a happy marriage – along with all the trappings of wealth. Yet as he recalls his past from the afterlife, a story emerges of the unspoken and bitter jealousies between brothers and of an unhappy wife burdened by loneliness and guilt.

When Ben takes over the running of Harry’s charity foundation he begins to find purpose for the first time in years. But the arrival of a talented young artist brings a series of revelations that expose Harry’s complex and dual personality in full. As he learns his part in the suffering of those he left behind, is it too late for Harry to make amends?

A tale of regret and redemption in this world and the next. From the Outside looks at the futile rivalries that can destroy sibling relationships and the lost opportunity for happiness when ego is allowed to reign over emotion.

Author Info

Clare Johnston is a journalist and content specialist, and a frequent contributor on radio and TV, having appeared on Radio 4’s Woman’s Hour, The Kaye Adams Programme and comedy satire show Breaking the News on BBC Radio Scotland, along with STV2’s Live at Five. She is a former editorial director of Press Association Scotland and commercial editor and columnist with the Daily Record. She is currently working with the DC Thomson media group and supports businesses with communication and content creation. Clare is based in Edinburgh.    

 

Buy Link

https://amzn.to/2ZbThH8

happy reading 🙂

 

 

A Killing Sin by K. H. Irvine Author @KHIrvineAuthor #BlogTour #AuthorInterview #LoveBooksTours

Welcome to my stop on K.H. Irvine’s A Killing Sin blog tour with Love Books Tours!

A Killing Sin tour

Many thanks to Kelly @ Love Books Group Tours for arranging the following interview with K.H. Irvine…..

 

For those who don’t know already, could you tell us about yourself and your book(s) please?

Hi Kerry thank you for asking!

I am Scottish but have lived in or around London for over 30 years. I have worked all over the world focussing on what really makes people tick – how do we get to be at our best and what derails us from getting there. I am totally fascinated by people, why they do what they do and what they might do in extreme circumstances.

I am married with two daughters and in a few weeks about to be the proud owner of ‘Dorothy Barker’ (Dotty) a Cavapoo.

The book was my 50th birthday gift to myself (never too old to give something a go).

In summary:

Amala Hackeem, lapsed Muslim tech entrepreneur and controversial comedian, dons a burqa and heads to the women’s group at the Tower Hamlets sharia community. What is she doing there?

Ella Russell, a struggling journalist leaves home in pursuit of the story of her life. Desperate for the truth. She is about to learn truth is the first victim in the war on terror.

Millie Stephenson, a university professor and expert in radicalisation arrives at Downing Street to brief the prime minister and home secretary. Nervous and excited she finds herself at the centre of a nation taken hostage. And then it gets personal.

Friends since university, by the end of the day and all three women’s lives are changed forever. They are about to find out if friendship is stronger than fear.

And who is Nusayabah? The damaged and strategically brilliant terrorist holding the nation hostage.

She strikes at the centre of power, the establishment and the lives of the three friends.
For her it’s personal. But who is she?
How can she know so much?
How far will she go?
Can they find her before it’s too late?
I hope it is an audacious first novel, gripping from start to finish, full of hairpin twists and turns and with some thought-provoking insight.

Where did/do you get your ideas from?

The first idea was about being a feminist. I worry that even now we don’t have equality. We are reluctant to talk about the impact of extremism on women. I worked with a very senior professor at the LSE and we were in Lebanon and Jordan. One night we were watching the flares over the Gaza strip and she told me about her work with women in Afghanistan. Three generations of women in one family; the Grandmother showed her photos of when she was a young woman – she looked exactly like Dusty Springfield (all eye liner, big hair and a mini skirt), the Mother was deeply traumatised by having lost her job as a teacher when the Taliban had arrived and the Daughter was swathed in a niqab and had bought the whole idea that she didn’t need an education. I couldn’t get that story out of my mind.

I also spoke to soldiers who had been undercover in Afghanistan for years and the whole idea about the way the world could be moving as we sleep walk into a return to medieval ideas fascinates me.

I hear a lot of secrets through my work and secrets are what drive many stories. Keeping them, fearing them and sharing them drives a story. The core of the story is really vulnerability – vulnerability exploited is what radicalisation is. When we are vulnerable we create a ‘cognitive opening’ and it can be manipulated by charismatic people with an agenda (doesn’t matter if it’s terrorism, drugs or sex…its all exploitation)

I also like the idea that women are the main characters – they are funny, flawed, vulnerable and strong and that they can be in big roles and be great friends (one agent rejected the book on the basis of that not being realistic – bah!)
Are any of your characters based (however loosely) on anyone you know?

Yes, but loosely. I am sure everyone writes a little bit of themselves into characters – both how we are, how we might like to be and how we would be if some our traits were amplified or we found ourselves in unexpected circumstances. Millie is closest to me but only in parts. Through work I have met hundreds of people who share their deepest secrets with me …I have stolen quite a few of those.

How do you pick your characters’ names?

Some for what they mean. Millie is ‘loud and brash’, Amala ‘makes you laugh and has your back’. Nusayabah is the first woman to fight side by side with Allah. Some just seem to fit…I change them quite often as the character develops.

Can you share your writing process with us, in a nutshell?

I have a house on the north coast of Ireland and I go for a week at a time. I buy a big box of Celebrations (other chocolates are available) and on the first day I sleep and re read what I have then I walk along the beach trying to immerse myself back in the story. I have a playlist that always has ‘Take me to Church’ on it as it was out when I first started the book and always makes me think about the lyricism of the Irish and how they tell great stories. I play it really loudly and dance and sing with no one looking!

I then write with no editing for a few days and then go back through with notes for research. Sometimes I can write 5,000 words a day and sometimes 500 and some days zilch.

Who are your top 5 favourite authors?

Really – that’s like asking you to pick your favourite child???
So….
Margaret Atwood (she is awesome and so able to tell a story that makes you think!)
Khaled Hosseini (A Thousand Splendid Suns could be my favourite book in the world)
Martha Gellhorn (no one wrote about the waste of war better than her)
Jo Jo Moyes (best escapism)
Ken Follett

Our well being is, in part, linked to learning. All of these authors help you learn something quite often without feeling like you are until you reflect on it later.

If you could meet any author, who would it be and what would you ask them?

Maya Angelou – because I couldn’t fit her into the top 5! I would ask her what has enabled her to remain so gracious and what does she see as her legacy?

Were you a big reader as a child?

Ridiculous – I was always the one with the torch under the covers and my idea of heaven was Enid Blyton!

When did you start to write?

Not until I was 50 – I didn’t have the confidence before then

If you could re-write the ending to any book what would it be and what would you change?
Is there a book you wish you had written?

My oldest daughter who read English Literature stunned me when she told me that the ending of The Road by Cormac McCarthy was not a happy ending – I had lived in blissful ignorance that the boy was saved.

A Handmaid’s Tale – it is fabulous. It is a wake up call, it stands the test of time, the characters are amazing and it still disturbs me having read it half a dozen times.

If you wrote an autobiography, what would your title be?

Live your own big life

If you could invite any fictional character for coffee who would it be and where would you take them?

Catherine Earnshaw and I would ask her if she fast forwarded to today what would she do differently and it would have to be Betty’s tea room for Yorkshire tea.

What are you working on right now?

Book number 2 is a few years further on from a Killing Sin and is about the rise of the Alt Right. There is a tit for tat war on the streets of the UK and we have normalised some pretty appalling views. Two characters return Millie and Alex plus some new ones. Again, it meshes the personal and the political in a female led thriller.
Number 3 I have in mind to call 11 Days – maybe apocryphal but that’s how long it can take any one of us to fall through the net and end up on the streets, I want to write it backwards from day 11 to day 1 so it’s hard to guess who it is that is begging for money in the prologue.
Tell us about your last release?

This is my first

Do you have a new release due?

Not yet

What do you generally do to celebrate on publication day?

It’s still to come but I feel wine may be involved

How can readers keep in touch with you?

Twitter and Instagram
KHIrvineAuthor

Is there anything else you would like us to know?

It’s a fast paced, page turner that I hope makes your heart beat faster.
Let me know what you think of it!

Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions!

Thank you, Kerry

A Killing Sin cover

‘This impressive debut is a tense, taut thriller straight out of today’s headlines.’ – Natasha Harding, The Sun

‘An audacious first novel, gripping from start to finish, full of hairpin twists and turns.’ – Nik Myers

Would you surrender your secrets to save a life?

London. It could be tomorrow. Amala Hackeem, lapsed Muslim tech entrepreneur and controversial comedian, dons a burqa and heads to the women’s group at the Tower Hamlets sharia community. What is she doing there?

Ella Russell, a struggling journalist leaves home in pursuit of the story of her life. Desperate for the truth, she is about to learn the true cost of the war on terror.

Millie Stephenson, a university professor and expert in radicalisation arrives at Downing Street to brief the Prime Minister and home secretary. Nervous and excited she finds herself at the centre of a nation taken hostage. And then it gets personal.

Friends since university, by the end of the day the lives of all three women are changed forever. They will discover if friendship truly can survive secrets and fear.

happy reading 🙂

 

#FlashbackFriday July 2019 with @tessmakovesky @rach_b52 @nicholl06 @AnnaMansell @andrewgmarshall @TillyTenWriter & @RachelAmphlett #BookReviews

Hi and welcome to my Flashback Friday feature!

On the first Friday of each month I like to have a little look back at what I was reading during the same month in previous years, since starting my blog.

Please do join in if you have the time. I’d love to see your posts 🙂

Here are my reviews from July 2018 (plus a link to a previous FBF post)…..

Raise The Blade by Tess Makovesky @tessmakovesky @caffeinenights #BookReview

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Unshackled by Rachael Stewart @rach_b52 #BlogTour #BookReview #Giveaway @rararesources

unshackled ad [d]

White Is The Coldest Colour by John Nicholl @nicholl06 #BookReview

White Is The Coldest Colour cover

How To Mend A Broken Heart by Anna Mansell @AnnaMansell @bookouture #BookReview #Netgalley

How To Mend A Broken Heart

The Power Of Dog by Andrew G. Marshall @andrewgmarshall @RedDoorBooks #BlogTour #BookReview

The Power Of Dog cover

The Summer Getaway by Tilly Tennant @TillyTenWriter @bookouture #BlogBlitz #BookReview

The Summer Getaway cover

Gone to Ground #KayHunter6 by @RachelAmphlett #BlogTour #BookReview #damppebblesblogtours

Gone To Ground cover

#FlashbackFriday with @KatyHogan @ConradDebby @MishaHerwin #BookReviews

Have you read any of the above?

 

#Interview with #author Dick Wybrow @42FordPrefect #TheInbetween

Today I have the pleasure of welcoming Dick Wybrow to Chat About Books!

His most recent book, The InBetween, is OUT NOW! (Purchase link to follow.)

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The InBetween author Dick Wybrow

For those who don’t know already, could you tell us about yourself and your book(s) please?

I’m a lifelong story-teller. In my youth, this helped me get out of trouble on occasion. Now, my mother would call these lies… however, I’d prefer to say this was merely honing my craft.

 

A Canadian who moved to the US around the age of ten, for most of my life, I’ve been an outsider. I found the best way to attract friends (and not get beat up by the bigger kids) was to be entertaining. Or at least interesting. I then took that to the page and at the age of 17, I wrote my first book.

 

It was terrible.

 

But, I kept writing and eventually found a way to get “instantly published.” That what stand-up comedy. Around the age of 20, that was my career. In Minneapolis, I worked with some amazing people like the comedian Louis Anderson. Later, I would perform with pros like Kevin Pollack and Larry the Cable Guy.

 

I made the switch to rock radio deejay (this is obviously they play a big part in my stories) for about a dozen years. Then I worked at CNN for a while and now, when I’m not writing, produce a live, comedy-news show in New Zealand.

 

My hope is always that my books entertain. I’m not really trying to “make a point”, other than maybe we should be nicer to each other. And don’t underestimate how great people can be (especially those who we do habitually underestimate).

 

A very nice best-selling author summed up my writing like this: Dick, you’re a humor author who likes his reality to be a little bit unreal. Your characters and stories exist in worlds that look like ours, but often a layer is peeled back to reveal there is something extra underneath.

 

That nice descriptor has become a part of my bio the last year.

 

I currently have four books The Mentor, The Swordsmen (of Fifty Shades of Gray Matter), Hell inc, and The InBetween.

 

The latter published on July 1st.

Where did/do you get your ideas from?

This is an author’s most dreaded question because the answer is basically, I don’t know. They just show up. I’m lucky.

 

Are any of your characters based (however loosely) on anyone you know?

I like to say that I “plagiarizer life.” While no character is directly someone I know, I’d say most are a combination of friends, family and just people I meet.

 

How do you pick your characters’ names?

I just sort of reach out with my mind and take what’s given to me. The InBetween‘s main character Painter Mann is a bit different but for the most part, it’s just what hits me. For some of the side characters, they are often people I know.

 

On occasion, I’ve put in a sort of place holder for a name with the thought of changing that later. I’m hit and miss with this strategy. A fun stoner character in The Mentor was originally named Melon because I picture a guy with a mess of curly hair (yes, this made sense to me at the time). Later, I changed that to Pavan because it fit better.

 

In The InBetween the character name Jan Jorgensen was supposed to be a place holder. It’s a mash-up of names I’d heard back when I lived in the Minneapolis area (the first name is Norwegian, pronounced like “Yahn”). In truth, it’s a cumbersome name but in the end it just sort of worked, so I left it.

 

Can you share your writing process with us, in a nutshell?

 

I get up each morning at 4:45, make coffee for my beautiful wife and crawl into my office to write. I now use Scrivener, so I can track my words. I tried to bang out at least 1500 a day.

 

Another thing: I try to not end a day’s writing at the end of a scene. It’s hard to kick start a new scene at 5am, so it’s best that there’s something already happen that you can finish. I always try to wrap up the morning’s writing in the middle of something. It’s just easier to pick it up again.

 

Who are your top 5 favourite authors?

 

That changes all the time (and it probably should), but as for modern authors, I love these guys:

 

Douglas Adams

Carl Hiaasen

Janet Evanovich

Dean Koontz

Johnny Shaw

 

Of course folks like Mark Twain, Charles Dickens and others taught me heaps as a young writer.

 

If you could meet any author, who would it be and what would you ask them?

Douglas Adams. I’d just ask how he determined something was funny versus just absurd for the sake of being absurd. He was brilliant. He was taken from us far too young.

 

Were you a big reader as a child?

 

At the age of six, I was given my first book by my father. It was Wind in the Willows. Naturally, that put me off reading for several years.

After discovering The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, I caught the reading love bug. And with it came the compulsion to get lost worlds like Douglas had created.

 

When did you start to write?

Probably pre-teens. But my first novel was written when I was 17. As I said before, it was terrible.

 

If you could re-write the ending to any book what would it be and what would you change?

Hopefully, stories are crafted in a way that the characters dictate. So, with that in mind, I wouldn’t be so bold as to tell any of them they’re wrong.

 

Is there a book you wish you had written?

 

As a kid, I fell in love with Dune. Frank Herbert’s style dazzled me. I can’t do what he does.
If you wrote an autobiography, what would your title be?

 

To be honest, I have far better stories to tell than my own. I can’t imagine ever taking the time to write one.
If you could invite any fictional character for coffee who would it be and where would you take them?

 

My love for Hitchhiker’s runs deep. I’d love to meet Ford Prefect and do a pub crawl.

 

What are you working on right now?

 

I’m working on Book 2 of the Painter Mann series. The plan is to have that available to readers by December 1st.
Tell us about your last release?

 

The InBetween is about a dead private investigator. He’s a ghost. His job is to help other ghosts move on, those who are stuck in “The InBetween.”  You get there if you’ve been murdered, and the killer isn’t known.

 

Painter investigates the death of his clients and once the murder is revealed, those ghosts are “cleared,”– that is, they move on to whatever is next (Heaven? Hell? A big ghostly shopping mall?).

 

Our hero stumbles upon the case of a serial killer. Revealing that murderer would clear dozens of ghosts, something he’s sworn to do. However, Painter realizes this is the person who also killed him!

 

So will he reveal the name of the killer, if that means he will also clear… leaving behind all of those lost souls in The InBetween with no one to help them?

 

(hint: you have to read it to find out)

 

Do you have a new release due?

 

The InBetween publishes July 1st.
What do you generally do to celebrate on publication day?

 

To be honest, nothing much special. I should do something, right?  But, for now, I just keep writing the next one.
How can readers keep in touch with you?

Email or Instagram. I don’t really pay much attention to Twitter or Facebook.  All those details are on my website: dickwybrow.com

 

Is there anything else you would like us to know?

 

As you’ll learn in the new book, Painter has three rules to live by for the living and the dead. The first one is basically be nice to people. As a rule, I think we should all strive to do that.

Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions, Dick 🙂

 

Thank you for asking.  Good luck with Chat About Books. Nice site!

The InBetween (Painter Mann Series Book 1)

Painter Mann is a one-of-a-kind private investigator. He may even be the world’s best, but mainly that’s because he’s dead.

Assisted by his “Temps”— a select few of the very old who are so close to death they can actually hear him— Painter has sworn to help the murder victims stuck in The InBetween by revealing their killers so they can move on.

But, a new mass murder case threatens everything after Painter recognizes the killer’s face as the person who murdered him.

Exposing them will free dozens of ghosts but will also clear Painter, leaving no one to help the souls trapped in The InBetween.

Also, he’s really into the whole private investigator thing. When alive he was never really good at much. Dead? He’s a hell of a PI.

Is Painter willing to risk it all to save those he’s sworn to help?

happy reading 🙂

 

The Determined Lord Hadleigh by VirginiaHeath @VirginiaHeath_ #PublicationDayPush #BookReview @rararesources

Happy Publication Day, Virginia Heath 🙂

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Having read, and thoroughly enjoyed, The Disgraceful Lord Grey by Virginia Heath, back in March, I was keen to read The Determined Lord Hadleigh and I am so glad I have. I really must read the first two books in this series. I wish I had discovered this author sooner as Virginia Heath really knows how to write characters you will fall in love with.

Penny is an instantly likeable character and one I initially felt sorry for given her circumstances, but it is soon obvious she needs no-one’s pity. She’s a feisty, determined lady, but also scared to trust again. Totally understandable given what she went through with her abusive husband.

Lord Hadleigh is a successful lawyer and is, in my mind, quite easy on the eye! He is quite blatantly taken with Penny. He does his best to help her, but only seems to insult her independence so when the opportunity arises for him to help her, in a less direct way, he takes the chance and she accepts, agreeing to be the housekeeper of his estate.

The romance that blossoms between them during this time isn’t at all straight forward, but is passionate and powerful all the same. I was willing them both to give in to their obvious desire and to allow themselves to be deliriously happy, as I knew they could be. Their love and respect for one another is quite beautiful. I have loved joining them on their journey to happiness.

It was lovely to briefly catch up with Lord Gray and Thea once again also.

If you love historical romance you will love this book, and the others in the series, I’m sure.

The Determined Lord Hadleigh

The Determinded Lord Hadleigh cover UK better

Haunted by Penny Penhurst’s courage on the witness stand, meticulous barrister Lord Hadleigh offers her a housekeeper position at his estate. Despite trying to stay detached, Hadleigh is charmed by her small child and surprised by how much he yearns for this proud woman! Can this he break through his own – and Penny’s – barriers to prove he’s a man she can trust…and love?

Purchase Link –

http://viewbook.at/kingselite4    

happy reading 🙂

Author Bio –

Virginia Heath

When Virginia Heath was a little girl it took her ages to fall asleep, so she made up stories in her head to help pass the time while she was staring at the ceiling. As she got older, the stories became more complicated, sometimes taking weeks to get to the happy ending. Then one day, she decided to embrace the insomnia and start writing them down. Despite that, it still takes her forever to fall asleep.

Social Media Links –

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/virginiaheathauthor

Twitter: https://twitter.com/VirginiaHeath_

Giveaway

Win one of two e-copies of The Determined Lord Hadleigh by Virginia Heath (Open INT)

*Terms and Conditions –Worldwide entries welcome.  Please enter using the Rafflecopter link below.  The winner will be selected at random via Rafflecopter from all valid entries and will be notified by Twitter and/or email. If no response is received within 7 days then Rachel’s Random Resources reserves the right to select an alternative winner. Open to all entrants aged 18 or over.  Any personal data given as part of the competition entry is used for this purpose only and will not be shared with third parties, with the exception of the winners’ information. This will passed to the giveaway organiser and used only for fulfilment of the prize, after which time Rachel’s Random Resources will delete the data.  I am not responsible for despatch or delivery of the prize.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Good luck!

 

The Teeth Of Giants by Gordon Wallis @zimbabaloooba #BlogTour #BookPromo @rararesources

The Teeth of Giants

The Teeth Of Giants

The Teeth Of Giants

In the brutal war on Elephant poaching in Africa one man takes a stand against a ruthless international ivory smuggling syndicate. A stand that almost costs him everything.

Jason Green never for one minute expected the appalling violence and horror he would endure when he returned to Africa to pay his respects to an old friend.

A profound sense of guilt and nostalgia prompts London based ex soldier Jason Green to return to Africa for the funeral of an old friend killed in suspicious circumstances in The Zambezi Valley. He is about to be sucked into the murky and brutal underworld of the illegal ivory trade. Grave injury and a burning desire for revenge thrust Green from the blistering heat of The Zambezi Valley to the tropical coast of Mozambique and beyond. Every tortured step of this journey is fraught with extreme danger and the ever present threat of death.

The Teeth Of Giants is the second novel by Gordon Wallis featuring his main character Jason Green. Readers of thrillers set in Africa will devour the frenetic pace and sheer brutality of this gritty crime thriller.

Pick up The Teeth Of Giants today and prepare for the ride of your life.

Purchase Link:
UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07QHY66Q2
US – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07QHY66Q2

Author Bio –

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Gordon Wallis is a 50 year old author based in Zimbabwe , Southern Africa. Born of British parents he has lived there all his life. A keen reader of thriller novels , particularly those set in Africa , he has travelled extensively in Africa , Europe , The Middle East and Asia. He runs a number of businesses in Zimbabwe and is single.

Social Media Links –

https://www.facebook.com/gordon.wallis
https://twitter.com/zimbabaloooba

Follow, like and share the book love with these awesome book bloggers…..

The Teeth of Giants Full Tour Banner

happy reading 🙂

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